If an indeterminate pronoun acts as the subject of the sentence, it can cause confusion when it comes to the subject-verb agreement. Examples of indefinite pronouns are words like “everyone,” “all,” “nobody,” “a lot,” “everyone,” and “none.” Undetermined pronouns can lead to subject-verb concordance errors, as they can relate to a group while being singular, like this example: Verb-subject-treasure hunt game In this online game, students indicate the appropriate verb for the sentence and can search for treasures if they are right. The game checks the answers at the end. Designed for elementary school students; ad-free; Headphones can be helpful. Although “physics” ends with an “s”, it remains a singular subject. The verb must also be singular, so “is” correct. To correct this error, think twice whether the theme is singular or plural. Subject-verb agreement A list of 6 possible teaching activities to help students learn subject-verb agreement. A coordinating conjunction such as “ni/ni” or “soit/ou” can be extremely confusing for subject-verb concordance. The rule here is to use the last noun of the pair to determine whether the subject is plural or singular. Here`s an example: the theme of this sentence is the singular “one”, not the plural “dogs”. This means that the verb should also be singular.

To correct this type of error, take a look at the sentence to identify the topic. If the verb passes first in the structure of the sentence, it can confuse the author or the spokesperson and cause an error in the subject-verb concordance. The following example shows how it works: because “Friends” comes after Jack, that`s the subject. As “friends” is plural, the obsal plural “wills”. To find errors like this, check the sentence every time you see a coordination conjunction. Here, “everyone” is a singular pronoun that actually refers to a group of people. It`s pluralistic, but it`s really unique. This means that you need a singular verb like “gets”. To avoid this type of error, place particular emphasis on indefinite pronouns when using them in your work. Take a moment to ask yourself if the pronoun is plural or singular, even if it refers to a group. The theme of this sentence is the plural “situations”, which means that it requires plural obsedation.

To correct this error, identify the subject to which the verb relates, even if it comes after the verb. Before you start correcting errors, you should be aware of the rules for subject-verb compliance.. . .