This group was a liaison body and not a power organ to which each party could send up to 20 support staff. It should meet at least once a year at each of the three sites (Beijing, London and Hong Kong). From 1 July 1988, it had its headquarters in Hong Kong. It should also assist the HKSARs in maintaining and developing economic and cultural relations and conclude agreements on these issues with the States, regions and international organizations concerned, and could therefore establish specialized sub-groups. Between 1985 and 2000, the Joint Liaison Group held 47 plenary sessions, including 18 in Hong Kong, 15 in London and 14 in Beijing. “Two Systems” refers to an agreement that Hong Kong would enjoy a “high degree of autonomy,” with its social and economic systems and way of life remaining unchanged for 50 years, from 1997 to 2047. First, given that the Sino-British joint statement relies exclusively on Chinese cooperation and has no other monitoring mechanisms, even if an international tribunal finds that the agreement has been violated, china is unlikely to give in. Britain has little other than to demand reparations; In response, China would “strongly condemn” and predictably reject such demands. However, this scenario would drastically undermine China`s international image and justify other countries reassessing their own agreements with China. The signing of the joint declaration sparked some controversy in Britain, with British Conservative Party Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher agreeing with the Chinese communist government, represented by Deng Xiaoping. [9] In the White Paper containing the joint statement, Her Majesty`s Government stated that “the alternative to the adoption of this Agreement is to have no agreement,” a statement intended to refute criticism that the statement has made too many concessions to China and highlights China`s considerable influence during the negotiations.

[9] Hong Kong`s autonomy was guaranteed by the “One Country, Two Systems” agreement, enshrined in the 1984 Sino-British Joint Declaration, signed by Zhao Ziyang, then Chinese Prime Minister, and Margaret Thatcher, British Prime Minister. One of the major achievements has been to ensure the continuity of independent justice in Hong Kong, including agreements in the legal fields of commercial shipping, civil aviation, nuclear materials, whaling, underwater telegraph, space and many others. . . .