Eu rules apply to all EU Member States, i.e. where bilateral agreements exist, they are not mentioned here. The two objectives of the totalization agreements are achieved in different ways in different agreements and make it essential to understand the concept and specifications of each home host alliance. Many totalization agreements follow the same general pattern of contribution and time. Below is a description of the types of agreements reached by some countries. Workers who have shared their careers between the United States and a foreign country may not be entitled to pensions, survivor benefits or disability insurance (pensions) from one or both countries because they have not worked long or recently enough to meet minimum conditions. Under an agreement, these workers may benefit from partially U.S. or foreign benefits on the basis of combined or “totalized” coverage credits from both countries. The goal of all U.S. totalization agreements is to eliminate dual social security and taxation, while maintaining coverage for as many workers as possible under the country where they are likely to have the most ties, both at work and after retirement.

Any agreement aims to achieve this objective through a series of objective rules. The agreements allow sSA to add U.S. and foreign coverage credits only if the worker has at least six-quarters of U.S. coverage. Similarly, a person may need a minimum amount of coverage under the foreign system to have U.S. coverage accounted for in order to meet the conditions for granting foreign benefits. Currently, the United States has totalization agreements with the following countries: Totalization agreements tolerate deviations from the above rules to determine which social security system should apply to a specific worker. If both countries accept an exception for a single worker, the country that has agreed to cover the worker in question will cover that worker accordingly. An exceptional example would be the renewal of a few months of a short stay in a country beyond the five-year limit for the application of the single-family house rule. An agreement could be reached between the two countries to ignore the worker`s additional three months abroad. This would prevent the worker concerned from being taxed by the country in which he or she works.